Skip to product information
1 of 1

FeedsForLess.com

Dried Brewers Yeast - (Henderson, NC)

Dried Brewers Yeast - (Henderson, NC)

Regular price $2,520.00 USD
Regular price $2,369.99 USD Sale price $2,520.00 USD
Sale Sold out
Tax included.

Brewers yeast is mainly a source of protein as it contains about 50% DM of crude protein (40-56% DM). However, as noted in Potential constraints below, the nitrogen of brewers yeast may contain up to a third of RNA nitrogen, which does not correspond to actual protein and is not usable by non-ruminants. Depending on the process, brewers yeast can contain fibre, starch and lipids, in amounts ranging from negligible to small but significant. Brewers yeast is an excellent source of B-complex vitamins, nucleic acids, vitamins and minerals, including a biologically active form of chromium known as Glucose Tolerance Factor (Ferreira et al., 2010). Brewers yeast contains various immunostimulating compounds such as β-glucans and mannan oligosaccharides (White et al., 2002). Nucleic acids also have an immunostimulating effect (White et al., 2002).

Potential constraints 

Ribonucleic acids

A limiting factor to the utilization of brewers yeast as a protein source is its high nucleic acid content, primarily ribonucleic acid (RNA), which may account for 33% of the total nitrogen. This can result in high uric acid in the blood of monogastric mammals fed brewers yeast (Ferreira et al., 2010). Uric acid has subsequent toxicological effects such as disturbances in the metabolism of fat, carbohydrates and uracil (Heaf et al., 1976). Some RNA-extracted brewers yeasts are thus sold to prevent this problem (Ferreira et al., 2010).

Ruminants 

Brewers yeast can be used as a feedstuff in ruminant diets. Large quantities of yeast are discharged as slurry from breweries or from the alcoholic fermentation of sugarcane, and might be as useful as the vegetable meals (especially cotonseed meal) for ruminant diets (Hennessy et al., 1993). Some yeast slurries are dried, which inactivates the yeast; but the high energy costs of drying might reduce the price competitiveness of the product against other protein sources. The influence of yeast on ruminant performance, either in dried or liquid forms, is detailed below. In all these studies, it was generally concluded that yeast can be used as an alternative protein source in rations for ruminants because it does not change animal performance and it has equivalent or higher nutritional value than soybean meal.

Note on yeast as probiotic

As indicated in the introduction, the probiotic effects of live Saccharomyces cerevisiae are beyond the scope of this datasheet. Supplementation of live yeast probiotics on intake, production and rumen fermentation characteristics has been widely studied during the past decades. Quantitative reviews generally reported modest improvement in rumen fermentation patterns, feed digestibility, dry matter intake, milk yield, fat corrected milk yield and milk fat content (Desnoyers et al., 2009; Robinson et al., 2009; Poppy et al., 2012; Elghandour et al., 2015). However, the response to yeast supplementation is not constant, depending on dosages, feeding times and frequencies, and strains (Elghandour et al., 2015).

Digestibility and energy values

In a comparison of dairy cattle diets supplemented either with soybean meal or with liquid brewers yeast, the digestibility of DM, gross energy, protein and ADF of a dairy cattle diet were higher with yeast supplementation (Steckley et al., 1979). But this effect is not consistent (e.g. no effect was found by Freitas et al., 2015). In goat kids and lambs, digestibilities of DM, OM, total carbohydrates and NDF were improved with increasing levels of yeast in the diet as a substitute for soybean meal (de Lima et al., 2011; Rufino et al., 2013). Rations with dried yeast showed the highest values of total digestible nutrients. The effect appears to be quadratic, with maximal digestibility coefficients for diets with approximately 45% inactive dried yeast (Rufino et al., 2013).

Dairy cows

In dairy cattle, the inclusion of dried brewers yeast as a replacement for soybean meal at up to 20% of the total dietary DM did not affect intake, digestibility or performance (Nursoy et al., 2003; Freitas et al., 2015). Some positive effects were observed, such as a low rumen NH3-N level and a high acetic acid concentration (Nursoy et al., 2003). Thus, dried yeast seems to be a valuable protein source in dairy cow diets. Liquid forms, such as brewers yeast slurry, can be fed to dairy cattle as an alternative to soybean meal, up to 12% of the diet DM, without any detrimental effect on DM intake, milk production and milk organoleptic quality (Steckley et al., 1979). Milk yield for diets with 30% wet brewers grains was higher with added liquid brewers yeast than without it (+1 kg/cow/day, West et al., 1994).

Main analysis Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
Dry matter % as fed 93.6 1.8 89.1 97.0 107  
Crude protein % DM 48.9 3.8 39.3 56.8 108  
Crude fibre % DM 1.8 1.3 0.1 4.4 56  
NDF % DM 8.8 9.4 0.0 20.7 6  
ADF % DM 2.5 2.5 0.0 5.7 6  
Lignin % DM 0.8 0.8 0.0 1.7 6  
Ether extract % DM 2.4 2.4 0.0 8.2 34  
Ether extract, HCl hydrolysis % DM 4.1 1.2 2.2 6.0 34  
Ash % DM 7.0 1.1 5.1 9.3 86  
Starch (polarimetry) % DM 10.9 7.0 0.0 17.5 5  
Total sugars % DM 1.9 1.3 0.3 2.8 3  
Gross energy MJ/kg DM 19.6 1.3 18.1 20.4 3 *
               
Minerals Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
Calcium g/kg DM 2.9 1.1 1.0 5.4 31  
Phosphorus g/kg DM 13.1 2.4 9.6 20.0 34  
Sodium g/kg DM 1.8 1.2 0.4 3.7 6  
Magnesium g/kg DM 2.4       1  
Manganese mg/kg DM 34 18 7 43 4  
Zinc mg/kg DM 114 44 55 154 5  
Copper mg/kg DM 23 33 1 80 5  
Iron mg/kg DM 78 44 27 107 3  
               
Amino acids Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
Alanine % protein 5.9 1.2 4.3 6.9 4  
Arginine % protein 4.4 0.7 3.6 5.2 6  
Aspartic acid % protein 9.0 2.2 7.7 12.2 4  
Cystine % protein 0.9 0.6 0.5 1.9 5  
Glutamic acid % protein 14.7 2.2 11.4 15.8 4  
Glycine % protein 4.0 0.3 3.7 4.3 4  
Histidine % protein 2.0 0.4 1.7 2.9 6  
Isoleucine % protein 4.6 0.8 4.0 6.1 6  
Leucine % protein 6.2 0.8 5.3 7.1 6  
Lysine % protein 6.3 0.9 4.6 7.6 12  
Methionine % protein 1.5 0.3 1.3 2.2 8  
Phenylalanine % protein 3.6 0.4 3.1 4.1 6  
Proline % protein 3.4       1  
Serine % protein 4.3 0.2 4.1 4.5 4  
Threonine % protein 4.4 0.7 3.7 5.6 6  
Tryptophan % protein 1.1 0.2 1.0 1.4 5  
Tyrosine % protein 2.7 0.1 2.5 2.8 4  
Valine % protein 4.9 0.5 4.5 5.8 6  
               
Ruminant nutritive values Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
OM digestibility, ruminants % 89.7         *
Energy digestibility, ruminants % 89.7         *
DE ruminants MJ/kg DM 17.6         *
ME ruminants MJ/kg DM 13.4         *
Nitrogen digestibility, ruminants % 79.5         *
               
Pig nutritive values Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
Energy digestibility, growing pig % 87.2         *
DE growing pig MJ/kg DM 17.1         *
MEn growing pig MJ/kg DM 15.9         *
NE growing pig MJ/kg DM 10.4         *
Nitrogen digestibility, growing pig % 84.3       1  
               
Poultry nutritive values Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
AMEn broiler MJ/kg DM 9.3       1  
               
Fish nutritive values Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb  
DE salmonids MJ/kg DM 13.7   12.8 13.9 2 *
Energy digestibility, salmonids % 69.7   62.6 76.8 2  
Nitrogen digestibility, salmonids % 77.1   63.2 91.0 2  

Shipping & Returns

Pop-up link text View full details